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20121226
20130103
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
the wall street journal, or the pentagon indicated they wanted to maintain 6000 to 15th thousand u.s. troops following 2014. that is the issue under discussion now. there's approximately around 340 0,000 afghan security forces in place, including the police. the pentagon recently indicated i don't believe there was a major unit capable of operating independently from nato support. there was some manipulation of the metrics they were using where the things appear to be making more progress than perhaps they were. that came out in a white paper. what will be the long term success or failure of the afghan national security forces is yet to be determined. they need about $4.1 billion a year to continue at that level, which is more than the entire government revenues in afghanistan. so it's gone to take a long-term commitment of foreign powers to maintain that size of armed forces. the afghans have proven that they are excellent fighters. the question is will they be excellent soldiers for the government of afghanistan? host: one other question, how stable do you think the karzai govern
they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. enter a young turk in 1971. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before he became secretary of state. he was still national security advisor. volcker's p
. the pentagon says there have been at least 154 suicides among active-duty troops through last thursday. a rate of nearly one each day. >> every day in this country, 18 veterans are committing suicide. 17% of the individuals in combat in afghanistan -- my brothers and sisters -- are on psychotropic medication. >> president obama announces the ministers and most of deporting hundreds of thousands of undocumented you whose parents brought them to the nine states. >> these were young people who studied in our schools, play in our neighborhoods, they are friends with our kids. they pledge allegiance to our flag. they are americans in their heart, in their minds, in every single way but one, on paper. now let's be clear, this is not amnesty, this is not immunity. this is not a path to citizenship. it is not a permanent fix. this is a temporary stopgap measure. >> biking as far redefined immigrants might movement in this country. we are taking a lead now. now we are unstoppable. i think our responsibilities to our community, to our parents, to the adults, is to continue that work, to look for permane
, the spending cuts to the pentagon and elsewhere kick in. the bottom line is when you talk to republican senators they say the issue is not taxes, it's if you give the president more revenue he'll spend it on more government programs. >> senator harry reid should have made sure the senate passed a budget sometime in the last three years and it would be reconciled with the house and you would have a framework, a budget resolution. the fact we're down to the 59th minute of the 11th-hour and a couple elected officials and unelected staffs behind closed doors doing a back room deal is an outrage. >> in the final moments, a key development is that vice president joe biden has been in delaware for the weekend. he came back a few hours ago and is huddled behind closed doors, two phone calls with mitch mcconnell. a year and a half ago, it looked like all hope was lost and vice president with his long time in the senate many years was able to reach out to mitch mcconnell and they pulled a deal together in the final hours. >> the 59th minute of the 11th hour. ed henry, thank you very much. >>> goi
.s. ambassador and three other americans were killed. our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence is joining us now with the findings. >> this new report spreads the blame for that attack. blaming intel, state, even the pentagon to some degree, saying there was no plan in place to rescue americans there. a new senate report says the state department should have shut down the benghazi mission before the attack that killed four americans. it chastised officials for relying on local militia to guard the front gate. >> the terrorists essentially walked into the compound, virtually unimpeded. >> senators say the state department missed plenty of red flags. a rocket propelled glen nate hit the red cross in may. a bomb exploded in june. another rpg hit the british ambassador's convoy, prompting the uk to close its mission. senators questioned how much more the state department needed to see before officials realized they didn't have enough security. >> we've got to close this facility because we can't protect american personnel in benghazi. >> reporter: the report also condemned communication failures. li
cuts kicking in. especially for defense. right now, the pentagon's looking at something in the neighborhood of a $55 billion cut in 2013, about 10% of its programs, and specifically, the "wall street journal," among others, reporting that the pentagon is making contingency plans to notify 800,000 civilian employees about possible furloughs. so this is front and center right now. and among those also sounding the alarm, senator lindsey graham after getting a call from defense secretary leon panetta over the weekend. >> last night at 7:30 during dinner, he said, lindsey, i'm told there's not going to be anything in this deal to avoid sequestration going into effect. >> there you have it in a nutshell. again, number one, we are getting hopefully a little more optimistic about either a short-term patchwork deal, setting the table for something bigger after the first of the year. but again, we've been talking primarily just on the tax side of the equation, the issue for the pentagon, the defense industry, and frankly, a whole lot of civilian employees, what about the sequeste
is a couple mission of the pentagon to it that was a andual i'll live to milan in administration. but it does not interest otters up continually there. this skepticism for the vietnam war and watergate which is mostly the washington post dory increased. the press became adversarial and maybe it will we have to have men ever serial left at have one cnn which is kind of trying to be the new york times and people are talking abut that people are not adversarial news. the stock above the neck down is it to section the newspaper. i notice the public editor who has probably talk to the look less people less times that i have have said, the day's paper is the granddaddy best friend of nuclear plant. the individual was get a little bit squeamish. some of you think i should say where are my sources. the book was a great deal of reading, i also was a very temperance and times of generous and giving me access. as one person or any view and expect to be. 1999-201. . all of the executive editress. by the time we were involved in this process a tentative before -- 1834 was a secondary investing. >> it does
that? and i want to say a word about sequestration. sequestration is about to kick in. the pentagon and our defense department is like a giant oil tanker. you got to turn it around in a very difficult and slow manner, because they have to make plans and they have to have contingencies -- procurement of weapons, have to do all the things that are necessary to make sure our men and women who are serving in the military are the best trained, best equipped and most professional in the world, which they are. but we're looking at sequestration here when the department of defense says it will decimate our adilt -- ability to defend this nation. shouldn't the president of the united states be concerned about that? but what is his own secretary of defense is saying and what his own chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, his selection, is saying. instead, we kind of joke around and tell people they're going to be here fear new year's eve. that's not the way to lead this nation. so i come to the floor and say to my colleagues, we need to get this done. we all know that we need to get this done
grew up on the pentagon papers, the secret history of the war, represent by daniel elsburg, is it true the papers were about vietnam was gaining territory. so perhaps by the '64 election this would have been major issue for kennedy, and he would have had to coming on more hawkish, again. >> counterfactual. we think kennedy had a certain kind of self-confidence. kennedy said at one opinion if somebody argues to me about unemployment, i can refute him. i have no problem. but somebody from the intelligence community or the military comes in, i always assume that they had a special knowledge that i didn't have. he says i've learned different. they really don't. he said at a later point, i'm going to tell my successor that the most important thing he has to learn is not trust the military, not to trust the joint chiefs. kennedy stood up to those people. >> in 2009, obama had the contrary result with the generals pressing him on afghanistan, the surge there. >> do you think -- i want to hear you talk about it -- has foreign policy in a grand sense changed at all since the colored war? it's b
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, pau
, so do have the debt ceiling fight coming up. when you say that it faces and, you expect the pentagon to say we would just hold everything? certainly years, serving months ahead of time. they have to plan on how many people to have in their workforce -- in the force, recruiting. you cannot turn on a dime, like a huge oil tanker. >> john, we will focus on folks that we did not know who are here. we will come right back. don't go away. take five minutes. >> this is just -- >> we saw senators mccain and 11 decide they will come back in a couple of minutes. as we wait, back to something that took place earlier this morning outside the capital. -- the capitol. >> i want to thank you for being here to call on house republicans not to drop the ball on the middle-class. also for the house to show up for work, right? the president is down at the white house, senator harkin and his colleagues are here. they are out on a paid vacation right now. boehner walked out of the allegations with the present and then he walked out of the house and tell all members to go home while we are four days away f
countries to rethink. >> a pentagon report this past summer found that iran's ballistic missiles were becoming more accurate, versatile and more deadly than ever. for years u.s. intelligence officials circled the year 2015. they believe by then iran could test an intercontinental ballistic missile with a range of 3500 miles. >> this gives them the ability it to attack a new european countries, which giving them a degree of political influence in a crisis they might not otherwise have. >> the latest intelligence report from congress was just released in the last few weeks. it reassesses that estimate and concludes iran is not likely to test an icbm in the nix years. >> we're joined by chris lawrence in washington. chris, first of all, why the change? why is that? >> well, suzanne, basically the report says that economic sanctions are making it harder and harder for iran to get the necessary components and materials. it also shows that the iranians are not getting the help they need from russia and china, whose support has be dropping over the past ten years. remember, there's a big dif
resonated around the pentagon. they say they're trying to get to the bottom of this and figure out how this all could have happened. >> and how many children do we think that were involved in this abuse? >> reporter: in this one case, right now, it's a handful, if you will. but what the parents are telling me is, they don't know if that's the entire story because the only videotapes to corroborate this are 30 days' worth of videotapes. the allegation is made on september 26th. the tapes go back one month. and they don't know what might have happened before that. suzanne? >> all right. barbara starr, thank you for following that story. appreciate it. >>> meet a man who has taken a stand on the national debt by trying to pay it off himself. and a choice. h n take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searc
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)